top of page

Understanding the different pastry doughs


Dough is an essential building block for many baked goods, and there are several types of dough to choose from. Three of the most common types are Sablée, Brisée, and Sucrée doughs. Although they sound similar and share some similar ingredients, they each have distinct differences in their composition and uses.


Two of the three doughs, Sablée and Sucrée, are considered shortcrust pastry. Shortcrust pastry is a term that refers to any pastry made with flour, fat, and water or another liquid, that is relatively low in sugar and has a crumbly, short texture. Both Sablée and Sucrée doughs are considered shortcrust pastry, but they have different ratios of ingredients and are best suited for different types of desserts. Sablée dough is typically used for sweet tarts and pies with a crumbly, sandy texture, while Sucrée dough is a rich and sweet pastry dough used for sweet pies and pastries.


Brisée dough, on the other hand, is technically not a shortcrust pastry because it contains a higher proportion of fat to flour, which gives it a more tender and flaky texture. However, it is often referred to as a type of shortcrust pastry due to its similarities to other pastry doughs made with flour, fat, and water. So while not all three doughs are strictly considered shortcrust pastry, they all share similar characteristics and are used for making various types of tarts, pies, and pastries.


Sablée Dough:


Sablée dough is a rich, crumbly, and buttery dough that is similar to a shortbread cookie. It is named after the French word for "sand," which is "sable." This dough is perfect for making tarts and pies, especially those that have a sweet or nutty filling. Sablée dough is made by combining flour, butter, sugar, and egg yolks until they are crumbly, sandy in texture, and well-combined. Sablée dough should be chilled for at least 30 minutes before rolling out and using.


One important factor in making Sablée dough is ensuring that the butter is cold and cut into small pieces before mixing it with the dry ingredients. This ensures that the dough is crumbly and sandy in texture, rather than becoming a cohesive ball. Another tip is to use a light hand when mixing the ingredients to avoid overworking the dough, which can make it tough.


Brisée Dough:


Brisée dough, also known as shortcrust pastry, is a flaky and buttery pastry that is used in savory dishes such as quiches and pies. Brisée means "broken" in French, which refers to the process of breaking the butter and flour mixture into small pieces before adding water. This helps to create the flaky texture that is characteristic of Brisée dough.


Brisée dough is made by mixing flour, salt, and cold butter until the mixture is crumbly. Water is then added gradually until the dough forms a cohesive ball. The dough is then chilled for at least 30 minutes before rolling out and using.

One key to making successful Brisée dough is to use cold butter and ice water, which helps to keep the dough from becoming too soft and sticky. Additionally, it's important to handle the dough gently and not overwork it, which can cause the dough to become tough and lose its flaky texture.


Sucrée Dough:


Sucrée dough, also known as sweet pastry dough, is a rich, sweet dough that is perfect for making dessert pastries and tarts. It is made by mixing flour, butter, sugar, and egg yolks until the dough is smooth and cohesive. This dough is named after the French word for "sugar," which is "sucre."


Sucrée dough is perfect for filling with sweet, creamy custards or fresh fruit. When making Sucrée dough, it's important to make sure that the butter is softened but not melted, which helps to create a smooth and cohesive dough. Additionally, the dough should be chilled for at least 30 minutes before rolling out and using.

One tip for working with Sucrée dough is to use a light touch when handling it to avoid overworking the dough, which can cause it to become tough. Additionally, adding a bit of flour to the rolling surface and rolling pin can help prevent sticking.


When to use which one:


Sablée dough is best used for tarts and pies that have a sweet or nutty filling. The crumbly texture of the dough pairs well with the texture of nuts or fruits.

Brisée dough is best used for savory tarts and quiches. The flaky texture of the dough is the perfect complement to a savory filling, such as cheese or vegetables.

Sucrée dough is best used for sweet pastries and tarts. The rich and sweet flavor of the dough is perfect for desserts such as fruit tarts or custard pies.






Comments


bottom of page