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What Is Reduction and How To Do It


Reduction in baking is the process of thickening and intensifying the flavor of a liquid by simmering or boiling it until a portion of the liquid evaporates. This technique is often used in glazes, syrups, and fruit reductions to add depth and complexity to a dish.


One of the most common sweet ingredients used for reduction in baking is fruit. When a recipe calls for a fruit reduction, it means that you will simmer the fruit until it has broken down and reduced to a thick, spreadable consistency. This can be done on the stovetop or in the oven, depending on the recipe.


The process of reduction is simple, but it does require some patience and attention. Here are the basic steps for reducing fruit in baking:

  1. Heat the fruit in a saucepan or pot over medium-high heat. Bring it to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium or medium-low.

  2. Allow the fruit to simmer, stirring occasionally to prevent it from sticking to the bottom of the pan.

  3. As the fruit simmers, it will begin to break down and reduce in volume. Keep an eye on the level of the fruit and stop the reduction when it has reached the desired consistency.

  4. The time it takes to reduce fruit will depend on the type of fruit being used. Soft, ripe fruit will typically reduce more quickly than firmer, underripe fruit. A basic rule of thumb is that it will take about 15-30 minutes to reduce 1 cup (240 mL) of fruit to a thick, spreadable consistency.

It's important to note that reduction is a cooking technique that requires a little bit of trial and error. The amount of time it takes to reduce fruit can vary based on the heat of your stove, the size and shape of your pan, and even the altitude of your location. The best way to determine when fruit has been reduced to the desired consistency is to keep an eye on it and give it a taste as it cooks.


In addition to using reduction to thicken and intensify the flavor of fruit, it can also be used to add depth and complexity to a dish. For example, a raspberry reduction can be used to add a sweet, tart flavor to a cake or pastry filling. To make a raspberry reduction, simmer fresh or frozen raspberries in a saucepan until they have broken down and reduced to a thick, spreadable consistency. This can take anywhere from 15-30 minutes, depending on the volume of fruit being used.


Reduction is also a common technique in pastry and dessert making. For example, a caramel sauce can be made by simmering granulated sugar and water in a saucepan until the mixture turns a deep amber color and becomes thick and syrupy. Or, a fruit reduction can be made by simmering fresh or frozen fruit in a saucepan until it has broken down and reduced to a thick, spreadable consistency.


In conclusion, reduction is a simple but effective technique for thickening and intensifying the flavor of a liquid in baking. Whether you're making a sweet fruit reduction, a tangy raspberry glaze, or a rich caramel sauce, this technique can add depth and complexity to your dishes. Just remember to be patient and keep an eye on the fruit or liquid as it simmers, and you'll have a delicious, beautifully reduced sauce in no time.

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